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Monday, 18 March 2019 00:00

What Causes Morton’s Neuroma?

If you have a condition that is known as Morton’s neuroma, you may notice pain in the ball of the foot. This may be a result of an irritated nerve that has become enlarged, and may occur between the third and fourth toes. Patients who are afflicted with this condition may notice a burning sensation in the sole of the foot, in addition to the toes possibly becoming numb. A common reason why Morton’s neuroma may develop may include wearing shoes that are too tight, or choosing footwear that does not provide adequate room for the toes to move freely in. This may cause pressure to be exerted on the nerves in the toes, which may cause pain and discomfort. Existing medical conditions may precede the development of Morton’s neuroma, and these may include bunions, hammertoes, or flat feet. Mild relief may be found in resting the foot, and performing gentle stretching exercises. If you have symptoms of this condition, it is advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly treat Morton’s neuroma.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact one of our podiatrists of Family Foot Care. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Valatie and Albany, NY. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 11 March 2019 00:00

Diabetic Patients and Foot Ulcers

Research has indicated that approximately twenty-five percent of diabetic patients may develop a foot ulcer. This wound can easily become infected, and may be prevented if proper care is administered. This may include removing the infected tissue from the wound which may be helpful in initiating proper healing. If an infection develops, it is necessary to start treatment which may include specific antibiotics. To keep the infection from getting worse, it is important to cover the wound with dressings that are used to treat diabetic wounds. This may allow for proper drainage, and may also provide an adequate moisture environment for the wound. It may be beneficial for many patients to stay off the foot during the healing process. If you are afflicted with a foot ulcer, it is strongly recommended to seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from Family Foot Care. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a nondiabetic. 

What is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Valatie and Albany, NY. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 05 March 2019 00:00

Causes of Blisters

A blister that develops on the foot can be painful and uncomfortable. It is most likely caused by excessive friction that occurs in one area of the skin. The outer layer of the skin disintegrates, and a small pocket of fluid forms over the raw skin. This is the body’s natural defense mechanism to protect the damaged skin. There may be other reasons why blisters may develop. These may include an allergic reaction to a bee sting or insect bite. Additionally, if the skin is burned by flames or frostbite, blisters may form to possibly prevent infection. There may be existing medical conditions that can lead to the formation of blisters, including contact dermatitis, or eczema. It is important to leave the blister alone, and it may drain on its own when the raw skin has healed. If you have a blister on your foot that has become discolored or does not heal, it is suggested to speak to a podiatrist who can prescribe medication, if necessary.

Blisters are prone to making everyday activities extremely uncomfortable. If your feet are hurting, contact one of our podiatrists of Family Foot Care. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters develop as a result of constantly wearing tight or ill-fitting footwear. This happens due to the constant rubbing from the shoe, which can often lead to pain.

What are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

How do Blisters Form?

Blisters on the feet are often the result of constant friction of skin and material, usually by shoe rubbing. Walking in sandals, boots, or shoes that don’t fit properly for long periods of time can result in a blister. Having consistent foot moisture and humidity can easily lead to blister formation.

Prevention & Treatment

It is important to properly care for the affected area in order to prevent infection and ease the pain. Do not lance the blister and use a Band-Aid to provide pain relief. Also, be sure to keep your feet dry and wear proper fitting shoes. If you see blood or pus in a blister, seek assistance from a podiatrist.

 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Valatie and Albany, NY. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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